Author Zane Grey

 

 
The Ed Harris and Amy Madigan Production of:
Pearl Zane Grey (January 31, 1872 – October 23, 1939) was an American dentist and author best known for his popular adventure novels and stories associated with the Western genre in literature and the arts; he idealized the American frontier. Riders of the Purple Sage (1912) was his best-selling book. In addition to the commercial success of his printed works, they had second lives and continuing influence when adapted as films and television productions. His novels and short stories have been adapted into 112 films, two television episodes, and a television series, Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater. After graduating, Grey established his practice in New York City under the name of Dr. Zane Grey in 1896. It was a competitive area but he wanted to be close to publishers. He began to write in the evening to offset the tedium of his dental practice. He struggled financially and emotionally. Grey was a natural writer but his early efforts were stiff and grammatically weak. Grey produced his best-known book, Riders of the Purple Sage (1912), his all-time best- seller, and one of the most successful Western novels of all. Hitchcock rejected it, but Grey took his manuscript directly to the vice president of Harper, who accepted it. As Zane Grey had become a household name, after that Harper eagerly received all his manuscripts. Other publishers caught on to the commercial potential of the Western novel. Grey became one of the first millionaire authors.   With his veracity and emotional intensity, he connected with millions of readers worldwide, during peacetime and war, and inspired many Western writers who followed him. Zane Grey was a major force in shaping the myths of the Old West; his books and stories were adapted into other media, such as film and TV productions. He was the author of more than 90 books, some published posthumously and/or based on serials originally published in magazines. His total book sales exceed 40 million. Grey did not just write Westerns. He also authored two hunting books, six children's books, three baseball books, and eight fishing books.   Many of them became bestsellers. It is estimated that he wrote over nine million words in his career.   From 1917 to 1926, Grey was in the top ten best-seller list nine times, which required sales of over 100,000 copies each time.   Even after his death, Harper had a stockpile of his manuscripts and continued to publish a new title each year until 1963. Zane Grey died of heart failure on October 23, 1939.
“I need this wild life, this freedom.” ― Zane Grey “Recipe For Greatness - To bear up under loss; To fight the bitterness of defeat and the weakness of grief; To be victor over anger; To smile when tears are close; To resist disease and evil men and base instincts; To hate hate and to love love; To go on when it would seen good to die; To look up with unquenchable faith in something ever more about to be. That is what any man can do, and be great.” -- Zane Grey
A Charles Haid Film
Riders of the Purple Sage